Aconcagua 360 Polish Route (6,962m)

Argentina

Hike the remote way to the summit of The America's highest mountain

Itinerary

Day 1: Meet the team

You'll check-in to your hotel in Mendoza, and have some time to relax. In the afternoon you'll meet the team and go through all the equipment for your expedition.

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After a relaxed start to the day, you'll head over to Penitentes-Puente del Inca where you'll obtain your mountain permits.

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Drive to Quebrada de Vacas. Beginning of the trekking to Pampa de Leñas. Setting up tents and resting. You will only carry your daypack; our mules will carry your personal equipment.

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Trek to Casa de Piedra. You may only carry a small backpack; our mules will carry your personal equipment

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Trek to Plaza Argentina base camp. Lodging. You will only carry your daypack; our mules will carry your personal equipment.

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Resting day in Plaza Argentina.

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Acclimatization trek and transportation of material to Camp 1. Lunch and return to Plaza Argentina.

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Resting day in Plaza Argentina. Checking of equipment for the ascent.

Climb to Camp 1. Setting up tents and resting. You will have to carry your personal equipment and additional supplies, if any. Our porters will carry the tents, garbage, and first aid kits.

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Acclimatisation trek and transportation of material to Camp 2. Lunch and return to Camp 1

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Climb to Camp 2. Setting up tents and resting. You will have to carry your personal equipment and additional supplies, if any. Our porters will carry the tents, garbage, and first aid kits.

Resting day in Camp 2

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Climb to Camp 3 by making a traverse to the Normal Route crossing the Polish Glacier's mythic base. You will have to carry your personal equipment and additional supplies, if any. Our porters will carry the tents, garbage, and first aid kits

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Climbing day from Camp 3 to the summit, using the Normal Route and returning to Camp 3.

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Descent from Camp 3 to Plaza de Mulas base camp. You will have to carry your personal equipment and additional supplies. Our porters will carry the tents, garbage, and first aid kits.

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Descent to Penitentes. You will only carry your daypack; our mules will carry your personal equipment. Drive to Mendoza. Lodging in a 4* superior Hotel

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Breakfast. Optional transfer from the hotel to the airport

Because of the nature of such an expedition, it is important to include a contingency day. The above itinerary is a guideline only. Although the guides will make every effort to adhere to this, it is likely that changes will need to be made, due to weather conditions or other unforeseen events. Please ensure you allow for this extra day when booking travel arrangements.

Extra days for contingencies as bad weather that may prevent the normal development of the program.

Book Now

February 2022
Sun
6 Feb
12:00AM
Thu
24 Feb
12:00AM
$3,899

($519 deposit)

Based on$3,899 USD

Book

8 spaces

FAQs

Included 

  • Guides
  • High altitude porters
  • Accommodation in Mendoza
  • Accommodation on the mountains (camping)
  • Transport during the trip
  • Assistance with obtaining a mountain permit
  • All food on the mountain
  • Tents and cooking equipment
  • Radio communication
  • Emergency equipment (including oxygen tube)
  • Certificate

Excluded 

  • International flights
  • Food in Mendoza
  • Mountain permit
  • Global Rescue and travel insurance
  • Visa (if applicable) 

The amount you spend will very much depend on your spending habits and how many souvenirs and refreshments you may purchase. You'll also be required to purchase a climbing permit, which differs in price from month to month. In 2020, the prices for the permits were as follows:

15th Dec - 31st Jan: $800

Any other time: $590

(PLEASE NOTE: 2021 and 2022 prices may differ)

If you arrive back in Mendoza on the 18th day (and do not use the extra days), then you will be required to purchase the 2 extra nights in your accommodation. Hotel accommodation is $100 per person, per night for a 4-star hotel.   

Tipping in Argentina is not mandatory, but often expected. A good rule of thumb is anywhere from $150 - $300 which the guide will distribute to all involved. Of course, you can tip more or less if you prefer.  

The porters will carry the tents and garbage and cooking equipment, fuel, first aid kit, oxygen tubes, toilet paper, and other elements, solid waste, and part of the meals.

You will carry some food during the acclimatization treks and your personal equipment when moving from one camp to another.

Base Camp

All meals are served in dining tents and prepared for by specialised chefs. This is the regular menu:

Breakfast: coffee, tea, milk, chocolate, cereals, bread, ham, cheese, crackers, cookies, pudding.

Lunch & Dinner: different types of cream soup, meat in different preparations, chicken in different preparations, different types of dried pasta with sauce, rice with sauce, pizza, tuna, different types of salads, etc..

Dessert: Fresh fruit, mousse, pudding, sweet potato.

Altitude Camps The guides prepare all the meals. Additionally, they are in charge of water production. The regular menu consists of:

Breakfast: coffee, tea, milk, chocolate, cereals, bread, ham, cheese, crackers, cookies, pudding.

Lunch & Dinner: different types of cream soup, different types of dried pasta with sauce, rice with sauce, tuna and different types of pre-cooked meals.

Dessert: chocolate, canned fruit, sweet potato.

The guides also include candy, different types of cookies, cereal bar, power gel, snacks, dried fruit, olives, etc.

City

Lunch and dinner is not included during your stay in the city. Breakfast is included at the hotel.


 

Yes, just let the guides know when completing your participation form. Depending on the requirement, there may be an additional charge.  

The guides’ first aid kits include oxygen, oximeter, basic medicines for altitude sickness (for legal reasons, they can be used under doctor's approval only), band-aids and gauze, and disinfectant for wounds. Aconcagua has a rescue patrol with doctors that take control if any medical situation occurs. The guides have never had any major medical problem in their 20 years of experience on Aconcagua.  

In short, no. Many factors could see your summit attempt cut short. This includes weather, medical issues, fitness, ability, or other eventualities. The guides will always put your safety first when on the mountain.

If a person cannot continue ascending, one of the group's guides climbs down with that person, and the rest of the group will continue ascending with the remaining guides. This is the process until there is only one guide left.

If there is only one guide left, with two or more climbers and someone has to descend, the group has to go down. For safety reasons, no one can be alone on the mountain without guiding assistance. 

From base camp to the summit, the expeditions have an average of 7 climbers with 3 highly professional and experienced guides. The group size is a maximum of 12, with 4 guides.

All of the guides are highly skilled English speakers with AAGM or EPGAMT licensing and are legally authorized by the Park authorities.

Mendoza city has one airport [MDZ].

There is also only one bus station (Terminal del Sol). 

While the itineraries are designed to allow for adequate acclimatization, you are likely to feel the effects of altitude sickness and oxygen deprivation whilst on this trek. Please be aware that your guide may deem it unsafe for you to continue trekking at any time and arrange for you to descend to a lower altitude. 

When you go above 2,500m, you need to allow your body time to acclimatize properly. When you are at altitude, you enter a lower oxygen environment. All relevant itineraries are designed to ensure that this process is met.  

So, what does this mean? This may mean that you may need to follow a longer route during the ascent phase to achieve the end goal. In this case, reaching Everest Base Camp. It may also mean that you must rest for a day or so at certain altitudes to ensure that our bodies acclimatize properly to the change in environment. This will allow you to ascend safely and have a much more enjoyable experience. 

High altitude sickness can happen to anybody – old or young, in good shape or not. Being in a hurry in the mountains can be deadly. Your body can adjust to this altitude, but only if given enough time. If you find symptoms of altitude sickness, then you must descend at any cost. The symptoms are totally different from one person to another. Sometimes you might feel a headache; you may feel you need to throw up, your fingers may go slightly numb, or you may start breathing heavily. If you have these kinds of symptoms, you should stop at this height. Drinking lots of water can help you out. 

You are advised to move slowly, don’t rush, and ensure you protect yourself from the weather.    

Feet

– 2 pairs of synthetic inner socks

– 4 pairs of thick socks for cold (ski type)

– 1 pair of comfortable trekking boots

– 1 pair of gaiters


Legs

– 1 pair of fine synthetic pants

– 1 pair of thick shelter pants

– 1 pair of rainproof pants

– 1 pair of comfortable long pants (trekking type)

Body

– 2 synthetic underwear shirts

– 1 turtleneck of synthetic material

– 1 fleece jacket of alike

– 1 shelter jacket (down or synthetical)

– 1 rainproof jacket


Head

– Sun cap or hat

– Shelter hat (wool or fleece)

– Light ski mask

– A good pair of sunglasses with UV filter and nose and side protection

– A pair of ski goggles

– A handkerchief for the neck

Hands

– 2 pairs of light inner gloves

– 2 pairs of rainproof gloves for shelter (mitten type)

– Wet towels

Expedition material

– Book or anything that helps to be entertained in the tent

– 1 Sunscreen

– Water bottles for three litres in total

– 6 pairs of hand warmers

– Sleeping mattress for high mountain

– Personal care elements

– Front lamp with extra batteries

– An stainless steel thermo of one litter or half a litter

– Personal crockery (Bowl, cup, fork and spoon)

– A synthetic or down sleeping bag for – 35 º C

Technical equipment:

– 1 comfortable backpack of 80 litres

– 1 Pair of double or triple boots for high mountain (suitable for 7,000m and – 40ºC temperature)

– Crampons

– Poles (optional)

– 1 helmet 

You'll head up the Polish route which does not present any technical difficulty; this means that you don´t require any previous climbing experience on rocks or ice. However, the route is slightly longer than the normal route. This route may be hiked, just by walking. You may have to use crampons and fixed ropes for your security, depending on the conditions of the route. The guides are going to be the ones that will make the decision about this on the day. The route may be dry or may have a solid covering of snow and ice. Hikers should have prior experience climbing to around 6000m before attempting Aconcagua. Previous experience of camping, as well as carrying loads of 10-12kg, would be an advantage. 

The summit day is long, ascending (from 5,950m at high camp to the 6,962m summit. This could take 7-10 hours to ascend and 2-4 hours to descend. You should make sure you are fit and used to long mountain days. 

Penitentes / Pampa de Leñas (10,230ft - 3100m)

Estimated distance: 12km

Estimated time: 6 hours

Pampa de Leñas / Casa de Piedra (11880ft - 3600m)

Estimated distance 15km

Estimated time: 7 hours

Casa de Piedra / Plaza Argentina Base Camp (13200ft - 4000m)

Estimated distance: 10km

Estimated time: 6 hours

Plaza Argentina / Camp 1 (16335ft - 4950m) / Plaza Argentina

Estimated distance:8km

Estimated time: 5 hours

Plaza Argentina / Camp 1 (16335ft - 4950m)

Estimated distance: 4km

Estimated time: 3 - 4 hours

Camp 1 / Camp 2 - Upper Guanacos (18095ft -5500m) / Camp 1

Estimated distance: 6km

Estimated time: 7 hours

Camp 1 / Camp 2 - Upper Guanacos (18095ft -5500m)

Estimated distance: 3 km

Estimated time: 5 - 6 hours

Camp 2 / Camp 3 (19740ft - 6000m)

Estimated distance: 2 km

Estimated time : 3 - 4 hours

Camp 3 / SUMMIT (22974ft – 6962m) / Camp 3 Climbing day from Camp 3 to the summit.

Estimated distance: 6km

Estimated time: 7 - 10 hours

Camp 3 / Plaza de Mulas base camp (Normal Route)

Estimated distance: 6km

Estimated time: 6 hours

Plaza de Mulas / Puente del Inca / Mendoza 

Estimated distance: 25km

Estimated time: 7 - 8 hours

Provided by Acomara Aconcagua Expeditions

Skyhook Adventure is an Authorised Agent of Acomara Aconcagua Expeditions. Please familiarise yourself with the Acomara Aconcagua Expeditions Terms & Conditions and Skyhook Adventure's Terms & Conditions.